Morimono ikebana arrangement in automne colors. Pumpkins, physalis, sunflowers. By Ekaterina Seehaus. Sogetsu school of ikebana.

Morimono – use of fruits and vegetables in Japanese flower arrangements

What do fruits and vegetables have to do with flower arrangements?

Japanese do not discriminate: any plant material can be used in ikebana, not only flowers and branches. There is a special type of arrangement called Morimono, which allows using pretty much any part of the plant in the composition.

If  you think of it, using branches with berries is quite common both in ikebana and in Western flower arrangement. But once we move towards fruits disconnected from branches we are out of the comfort zone. The known ways of fixing materials are no longer helpful and we are not clear how to show beauty of, for example, a tomato in our art creation.

Sogetsu ikebena by Ekaterina Seehaus morimono arrangement with watermelon and wind strawberries
Why couldn’t a watermelon become a container? Morimono arrangement and photography by Ekaterina Seehaus

So what is Morimono? In Japanese it literally means to pile up. It does not sound too artistic or pretty for that matter. Therefore our main goal is to make the pile attractive and artistically expressive. Following the main ikebana principles is crucial here.

If in doubt where to begin, start with selecting an unusual container for your unusual arrangement. This will set the tone and help you push your creativity boundaries. A nice board or a flat stone could give enough space for your artistic pile and will give it a bit of a modern edge.

Another approach could be to start with a choice of a color scheme. Same ikebana principles of working with color apply here. You can decide to go for the same tonal range (see above Automne arrangement) or contrasting colors (see red/green contrast of cabbage and peppers above) or simply emphasize one color – the choice is yours. This decision will help you pick the right grocery list for your next supermarket visit.

Another tip is to look for unusually shaped, odd pieces to avoid artificial look. If you have your own garden it is an added benefit. Home-grown fruits and vegetable are more likely to have unusual shapes. This can give you the key element, around which you could build your arrangement.

The point of this journey is to see familiar objects in a new light, to find out the main characteristics and features of a plant. For example it is nice to split bell peppers in half and show their seed pods or to disassemble cabbage and roll the leafs following their natural lines. Pealing off parts of skin on a darker vegetable such as aubergine could give you just the right accent. From there you could build a contrast based arrangement of dark vs. light colors.

Morimono ikebana arrangement red peppers, green cabbage, color contrasts. By Ekaterina Seehaus. Sogetsu school of ikebana
Arrangement with red peppers showing the inside and outside. Contrast of red and green colors. Ikebana and photography by Ekaterina Seehaus

There is a vast variety of techniques available for fixing vegetables in place. Next to the standard ikebana fixings you could, for example, use tooth picks to link several round objects together to prevent them from rolling or choose a larger vegetable as a base for fixing others on top of it.

And of course, nobody prevents us from using flowers or brunches next to the fruits or vegetables. At the end Morimono is quite flexible and broadens our artistic horizon.

Sogetsu ikebana Morimono with cabbage as a flower by Ekaterina Seehaus
Morimono with cabbage as a flower. Wooden chinese container. Ikebana by Ekaterina Seehaus

Whichever way you decide to go, keep it simple and have fun with it!

______________

P.S. Want to get more examples and tips on creating original harvest arrangements? Follow ikebanaWEB here and download my Morimono step by step seminar materials for FREE. I have just given this Morimono workshop to the Ikebana International group of Belgium. I hope it will inspire you to make your own arrangements or who knows, may be even to give a workshop!

Already following ikebanaWEB? One click download is here for you.

Amaryllis Beloeil 2016 report by Ekaterina Seehaus ikebanaweb.com

Amaryllis Competition at Chateau de Beloeil

The 2016 report from the Amaryllis Beloeil annual competition in Belgium.

This year we enjoyed the amaryllis viewings over the Easter weekend. This explains the giant Easter egg which was greeting all the visitors at the entrance.

This competition takes place in a nice historical setting of Chateau de Beloeil and (importantly) participants get a decent supply of sponsored amaryllis. What a great combination for those who want to make a bold artistic statement.

Artists are allowed to work in rooms filled with real antiquities – my compliments to the brave organizers. It gives a surreal feeling of time travel. Fresh flowers in the museum-like interior suddenly make it alive as if the inhabitants of the Chateau are just about to arrive for the dinner.

Dining room at Amaryllis Beloeil 2016 – 2nd place small teams. Photo by Ekaterina Seehaus ikebanaweb.com
Dining room at Amaryllis Beloeil 2016 – 2nd place small teams

One of my ikebana friends pointed out that most of the arrangements are quite Baroque. I suppose it is the way it should be to fit into the setting. Still my favorite arrangement was fairly minimalist. Only one color of flowers, clean lines and still very well integrated into the space. Here it is:

Amaryllis Beloeil 2016 - 2nd Place schools by Tuinbouw School Kortrijk ikebanaweb.com
Amaryllis Beloeil 2016 – 2nd place in the schools category by Tuinbouw School Kortrijk

Another item from my personal selection was in the music room arrangement: upside down amaryllis used as notes. I like the visual parallel. And it also makes amaryllis look lighter.

Music room flower arrangement at the event Amaryllis Beloeil 2016 at ikebanaweb.com

Unfortunately, similar to many other arrangements in the event these flowers were not given water supply. I find it a pity. Filling up steams with water and sealing them off with wax could have been a good option in my view.

Here is the the winner of the 1st prize in the large groups category. I guess the judges liked the fact that the flowers were integrated into the furniture pieces and not just used as separate decoration items. But this is only my speculation.

Floral arrangement 1st prize winner at Amaryllis Beloeil 2016 in the big teams category published on ikebanaweb.com
The 1st prize winner at Amaryllis Beloeil 2016 in the big teams category

In 2012 one of the fellow ikebana students also participated in this event and got a 2nd prize in small teams category. I will see if there is enough interest among the ikebanists to form a team and enter into the Amaryllis 2017 competition. You can express your interest either on Facebook or via e-mail ekaterina@ikebanaweb.com. The idea would be to make a clean and contemporary arrangement without clashing with the historical interior. Quite a challenge but also a great opportunity to introduce more people to the wonderful art of Ikebana.

To get a flavor of the past few events you can check out a Penterest Amaryllis Beloeil board with several short Youtube videos. It gives a pretty good picture of the spaces to fuel your inspiration.

An outside flower arrangement at Amaryllis Beloeil 2016 - withstanding the wind graciously
An outside flower arrangement at Amaryllis Beloeil 2016 – withstanding the wind graciously

Follow IkebanaWeb and receive a free report Keep Your Flowers Fresh, Longer.

Sogetsu Ikebana arrangement "Wind" by Ekaterina Seehaus

Essential Japanese vocabulary for Ikebana students

A helpful list of 70 Janapese terms frequently used in Ikebana (downloadable in PDF format)

When I started learning Ikebana Japanese words Kenzan, Moribana and a few others entered my world. It was fun and it felt exotic. It also gave some subtle sense of belonging to a group connected by a distant, unfamiliar language.

There is some tribal feeling in having a special language. It does not even have to be a foreign language. Often it is a language of a professional group or an abbreviated language of a big company.  I could talk about it for a long time… If you joined a new company and you hear a sentence consisting of 7 words, 5 of which are acronyms, you do wan to learn the “local language” very fast. Trust me, I know from my experience how knowing the a group language makes you either fit in or alienates you if you do not master it. Back to Ikebana.

When I just began with Ikbebana I was not temped to start taking lessons of Japanese. Still I wanted to use the right terms and I wanted to pronounce them right. After a few months of studying our teacher gave us a list of essential Japanese vocabulary used in Ikebana. Since then whenever I came across a new word I added it to this list. Luckily my teacher is Japanese so I could always check with her if I got the pronunciation and the translation right.

Preview of the PDF document with 70 Japanese terms useful for ikebana students

And sometimes it is more than just translation. You need an explanation of the concept, which does not exist in English or in your culture. In my list of Japanese vocabulary for Ikebana  I did not go as far as writing up stories to give context for understanding the words. But recently I started accumulating articles and videos illustrating some of the unfamiliar concepts. I hope one day I can issue an update to the list with some multimedia links.

For now I decided to share with the Ikebana Web followers my current version of the Japanese vocabulary for Ikebana students. You can view it on-line or use a secure download (3 page PDF file).

Are there any other Ikebana terms you would like to add to the list? I would love to hear from you.

 

FleurAmour report on IkebanaWeb.com by Ekaterina Seehaus

FleurAmour 20: Where More is More

FleurAmour is an annual mega event for the floral world. It was the 20th anniversary of this happening hence the title FleurAmour 20 – in case you were like me thinking that it was intended to be FleurAmour 2015 on the header image and the “15” has just fallen off, no, it is supposed to be just “20”.

This event takes place in an old castle where dozens of indoor and outdoor spaces are decorated by professional florists and students. Lots of live demonstrations, shows, workshops… In one day I have seen more flowers and florists than I could handle 🙂 Jokes apart, I never expected to say that there are too many flowers. I suppose over the years Ikebana’s idea of the effective use of flowers and the minimalist view of “Less is More” has made some irreversible changes to my brain.

Apart from the overwhelming quantity of flowers, I have enjoyed the event greatly. So in the spirit of open-mindedness and focusing on the endless learning opportunities between the Eastern and Western floral art I went wondering through the Alden Biesen castle in Belgium.

Round shapes at FleaurAmour 2015 by Jan de Ridder - event report on IkebanaWeb.com
Round shapes at FleaurAmour 2015 by Jan de Ridder

A couple of themes I have found particularly interesting and somewhat enlightening at FleurAmour. First the shapes: the good old round shape still seems to be the most harmonic and self sufficient.  In the crowds of all possible sizes, colors and forms clean round shapes stood out quite distinctly.

Round shapes at FleurAmour by Fabio Pedone - event report on IkebanaWeb.com
Round shapes at FleurAmour 2015 by Fabio Pedone

This year’s decoration of the castle’s church was done by Stijn Simayes. He was also giving live demonstrations with explanations and a bit of small talk and jokes in 3 or 4 languages. You might love or hate jokes like “there are only 2 types of men: smart and married” but it did cause some multilingual laughter. What I really appreciated is his openness and down to earth approach. For example those large circles used in the decoration of the castle’s church are actually from an old kids’ trampoline. Those who follow me on the facebook know that I appreciate up-cycling and particularly using old useless stuff to create art. Another interesting and fresh element in this installation was the use of green aquatic plants floating on the water surface.

Decoration of the Castle Church by Tomas De Bruyne – up-cycling rings from a kids’ trampoline - event report at IkebanaWeb.com
Round shapes at FleaurAmour 2015: Decoration of the Castle Church by Stijn Simayes – up-cycling: the giant rings are from a kids’ trampoline

The second theme I enjoyed was the use of flower scents. Not all flower varieties are equally fragrant, especially those industrially grown. Therefore when you walk into a room filled with scent of roses you just wanted to stay there. I did spend quite some time going around this installation.

A Room Full of Rose Scent by Regine Motmans at Fleuramour - event report at IkebanaWeb.com
A Room Full of Rose Scent by Regine Motmans at Fleuramour

There was another installation with lavender made by Russian artists from Siberia. Lavender was arranged on top of a wire mesh, which gave sufficient shame but at the same time made the arrangement look floating and very much in tune with the fragrance. And yes, it was tempting to smell the arrangement. And a lot of visitors did.

A Lavender Scent Room by Vadim Karanskiy and Roman Steinhauer Fleuramour at FleurAmour - event report at IkebanaWeb.com
A Lavender Scent Room by Vadim Karanskiy and Roman Steinhauer at FleurAmour

And the final unexpected discovery of the FleurAmour 20: there was a booth of a neuroscientist from Australia. Yes, yes, there are people who study how human brain responds to flowers. For sure I want to find out more about it and share with you in one of the next posts. In short: there was a selection of different Gerbera flowers on display and visitors were voting on the website during the event for their favorite ones. You could see lights flashing above each flower when somebody clicked on the on-line picture of this particular flower. The most popular one was this white and red Gerbera:

The most popular Gerbera of FleurAmour 2015 - report from the event on IkebanaWeb.com
The most popular Gerbera of FleurAmour 2015

The reason? Apparently humans like contrast. Hmmm, something to keep in mind for the next arrangement.

______________

Don’t want to miss the next post? Sign up for e-mail updates from IkebanaWeb.com on the home page and we will e-mail you a free report “How to keep your flowers fresh, longer”.

And the winner is….

Waterfall IkebanaWebFinally we can announce our Natural Creativity Challenge winner. The idea of this Challenge was to get people who have never been involved in Ikebana (or in any other type of flower arranging) to try making a flower composition. The main point is actually not the flower arrangement as such. It is more about restoring our connection with nature by communicating with flowers, branches and other plant material.

For the challenge folks were given a picture of a waterfall in a forest and were asked to reflect their impressions of the image in a flower arrangement. Simple… or may be not? Well, I did get feedback from some participants that it was simply too difficult and they are missing the “finesse”.

But with all that our winner Asya U. have done a great job of reflecting the mood, the colors and the movement of the original image. And she did not have any prior experience! Well done. Here is the picture and I’ll talk about the prize in a minute.

The winner of the Natural Creativity Challenge www.ikebanaweb.com
“The Waterfall” arrangement by Asya U., the winner of the Natural Creativity Challenge on IkebanaWeb.com

The prize is a 1 month free access to the Online Ikebana membership website. This will be a great resource for Asya to explore Ikebana principles, techniques and get inspiration for her creations.

For the rest of the Ikebana Web followers I can offer a link to some limited free training material courtesy of the Online Ikebana. Click on the link, register your e-mail and you will get instant access to one free lesson for beginners and to one for advanced Ikebana students.

Take this opportunity to explore your creativity further. Try it out and send me pictures of your arrangements 🙂

______________

Don’t want to miss the next post? Sign up for e-mail updates from IkebanaWeb.com on the home page and we will e-mail you a free report “How to keep your flowers fresh, longer”.

3D Challenge: Natural Creativity – entries are due in 5 days (Sept 20, 2015)

Good news folks: the deadline for the Natural Creativity Challenge is extended to September 20th. Photos of your arrangements have to be e-mailed to Ekaterina@IkebanaWeb.com by Sunday evening the latest.

THE PRIZE will be a 1 month FREE ACCESS to the new Online Ikebana subscription website.

This service is not yet released to the public. The exclusive early access is made available for the IkebanaWeb community. How cool is that? I already got the coupon code waiting for you here. (Thank you Online Ikebana team!) I had a sneak preview of the Online Ikebana site, there are loads of video tutorials for different levels of students. Really great stuff.

For those who have missed the original announcement of this challenge here is the link with the description. The entry is free. You need to take a picture of your flower arrangement and e-mail it to Ekaterina@IkebanaWeb.com no later than September 20.

Good luck and let your creative juices flow! Look forward to receiving your entries.

______________

Don’t want to miss the next post? Get free updates from IkebanaWeb via e-mail

Mass and like ikebana arrangement Sogetsu school by Ekaterina Seehaus ikebanaweb.com

3 Main Elements of Ikebana Flower Arrangements: #2 Mass

Mass in Ikebana arrangements is a somewhat controversial topic. On one hand it is quite similar to the appearance of Western arrangements and therefore is not “Ikebana-like”. On the other hand it is a rather difficult task to construct a proper mass. In several workshops I have seen advanced students and even teachers struggle with satisfying master instructors’ requirements with regard to their mass arrangements.

I will share with you what I consider important in arranging a mass. I am sure there are many points of view though, so feel free to leave your comments.

First, density is what defines a mass, so no compromise is acceptable. There should be no spaces  between flowers. If need be one can tighten the mass with a wire on the back of the arrangement.

Second, a shape of a mass does not have to be just a round ball of flowers. Interesting compositions can be created by constructing elongated or triangular shapes. Several masses together also can be quite impressive.

Ikebana Sogetsu Mass Color Gradient IkebanaWeb.com
Dahlias Color Gradient Arrangement with Elongated Mass Arrangement in Two Nageire Vases.

Third, a mass does not have to be made of the same color of flowers. Experimenting with color gradient is interesting. I have tried it in the above arrangement and then developed it further for one of my exhibition pieces described in an earlier post.

Mass ikebana arrangement Sogetsu school by Ekaterina Seehaus. Round Mass of Forget-me-Nots, Elongated Mass of Eucalyptus Leaves and a Cylindrical Mass of Cornus Twigs.
Round Mass of Forget-me-Nots, Elongated Mass of Eucalyptus Leaves and a Cylindrical Mass of Cornus Twigs.

And finally, flowers are not the only material, which could be used for construction mass. Mass in ikebana arrangements could be made of leaves, twigs, artificial objects, paper etc. Like in the top photo of this post I used a mass made of computer cable (or was it a printer cable?… not like it makes any difference). It nicely integrated with the color of the ceramic container, which I recently made and at the same time it gave good contrast to the color of the flower mass of Gerbera. Not to mention the contemporary look 🙂

Do you see how mass and color are closely interlinked and need each other to make the arrangement work? This brings us nicely to the next topic “Color”. Until the next post!

______________

Do you want to get more ikebana inspirations and helpful tips? Sign up for e-mail updates from IkebanaWEB.com and we will e-mail you a free report “How to keep your flowers fresh, longer”. This report covers many ikebana techniques for prolonging life of your arrangements through different treatments of stems.

Here is another free report for our subscribers Essential Japanese Vocabulary for Ikebana. It is downloadable as PDF document.

Lines in ikebana arrangements gladiolus and reed lines by Ekaterina Seehaus Sogetsu school of ikebana. ikebanaweb.com

3 Main Elements of Ikebana Flower Arrangements: #1 Lines

In one of the recent post we introduced the three main elements of Ikebana arrangements: mass, color and line. Traditionally they are all equally important. Well, let me use the words of Gorge Orwell “we are all equal but some are more equal than others” to express by bias towards the lines. Of course it is all about the overall harmony and balance but we all have our preferences. You guessed it right: lines in ikebana arrangements are my favorite element.

3 examples of different usages of lines in Ikebana. Sogetsu school. IkebanaWeb.com
Just a few example: combination of straight lines with curved ones, building a structure of crossed lines, using leaf surfaces as lines.

I find it interesting how the use of lines completely changes the character of your arrangement. It can make your arrangement static if you use horizontal or vertical lines or can add dramatic movement with diagonal or curved lines. Can you imagine all the possibilities!

Ikebana Sogetsu curved branch in a curved container emphasizing the movement.
Single curved branch in a curved container emphasizes the movement.

Even a single strong line in an arrangement makes it into a statement piece, into something, which catches attention and looks quite different from what you typically see in a florists’ shops. With bold lines and minimal number of flowers you can create arrangements, which will have a dramatic impact on the space where they are displayed.

There are plenty of different types of lines you can use in your arrangements: natural curves of branches, straight lines of reed and bamboo, peculiarly curled stems of flowers just to name a few. And if you add the lines made of artificial materials such as colorful cocktail straws, electrical wires (those could get pretty colorful as well), thin metal pipes … the possibilities are endless. You can combine straight and curved lines, add different texture, create modern look and test the limits of your creativity.

Sogetsu Ikebana Diagonal Lines with 2 moribana containers IkebenaWeb.com
Bundling several reed stems together for stronger impression. Containers leaned against each other to emphasize the movement.

Just start experimenting. If your material is really thin such as straw or reed, you can put several pieces together or even tie them together to make stronger impression like on the above photo. Another trick is using color to make your lines look more pronounced. On the first image of this post there are 2 reed stems, which are painted red. This gives them more visual “weight” and prevents the flowers from overpowering the thin pale reed stems.

Hope this post gave you some new ideas coming from the ancient Japanese art of Ikebana and inspired you to try expressing your creativity through arranging flowers in some new ways. If you make any pictures of your arrangements feel free to e-mail them to me Ekaterina@IkebanaWeb.com. It would be interesting to share those in the future posts.

______________

Don’t want to miss the next post? Sign up for e-mail updates from IkebanaWEB.com and we will e-mail you a free report “How to keep your flowers fresh, longer”. This report covers many ikebana techniques for prolonging life of your arrangements through different treatments of stems.

Here is another free report for our subscribers Essential Japanese Vocabulary for Ikebana. It is downloadable as PDF document.

Don’t want to miss the next post? Sign up for e-mail updates from IkebanaWEB.com and we will e-mail you a free report “How to keep your flowers fresh, longer”. This report covers many ikebana techniques for prolonging life of your arrangements through different treatments of stems.

 

ikebana flower arrangements Sogetsu Mass, Color, Line - 3 main elements. IkebanaWeb.com

3 Main Elements of Ikebana Flower Arrangements

Ikebana flower arrangements are mostly known for their minimalist aesthetics. Unlike the typical Western styles, which predominantly focus on creating large volumes of blooms, Ikebana puts equal emphases on the three main elements: mass, color and line.

This image is a simplified representation of an arrangement with the 3 elements being added one by one. First mass, then color and at the end the horizontal lines join the composition. See how they work together and change the overall impression of a simple Syringa (Lilac) branch?

Ikebana flower arrangements: Mass, Color and Line. Sogetsu school. IkebanaWeb.com
Main elements of Ikebana flower arrangements: Mass, Color and Line

Out of the 3 elements we are most familiar with the mass. Traditional bouquets are essentially masses of flowers. Color is an obvious one as well. But the line is not used much in the Western floral art. On a rare occasion we might see a line of a brunch being emphasized but that is pretty much it. Such details as flower stems or roots are almost never in the spotlight. Bamboo stems, reed, tall grasses can also provide wonderful inspiration and give a sense of movement to a composition.

But Ikebana flower arrangements do not have to contain all three element all the time. Sometimes you might consider focusing on one element and showcasing its beauty. It is all about balancing the 3 and using them effectively to create arrangements, which express your ideas and feeling.

To explore this topic further read the following articles focusing on mass, color and line. In those articles we provide illustrations of using each element in different types of arrangement. There is also some theoretical insights such as link to the color theory.

______________

Don’t want to miss the next post? Sign up for e-mail updates from IkebanaWeb.com on the home page and we will e-mail you a free report “How to keep your flowers fresh, longer”.

A 3D Challenge: Natural Creativity

A guided meditation to boost your creativity using the main source of it all: the nature.

I would like to take you on a quiet self exploration journey. The intention is to experience one of the important sources of your creativity: your connection with nature. No prior experience or special knowledge is required. You do not even need to see yourself as a creative person. Just let me explain first.

I became aware of this technique through my Ikebana flower arrangement studies. But similar exercise can be done in any field of self expression. The assignment we were given was quite simple: we received a photograph of a landscape and then we had to make an arrangement based on the personal impressions. And sure enough, everybody had arranged a very different composition. Here is the original photograph and my Ikebana composition inspired by it.

Ikebana Sogetsu Impression of an image IkebanaWeb

For me it was all about the contrast of the sharp, hard cliff with the soft blue of the sky and of the sea. Diagonal lines were also important as they gave some dynamic.

The materials are very simple and completely free: the piece of a tree trunk we picked up while walking through the fields nearby – an old hollow tree was cut and disposed off. The blue flowers are from a shrub in our garden and the yellow ones were just some weeds on the side of the road. The flowers are placed in a small bottle standing behind the piece of wood. Absolutely nothing special. Just going with a flow and keeping eyes open. Anybody can do this, right?

Now I want to challenge you with this:

1) Have a look at the picture of a waterfall below, get a feel of it, focus on your personal associations.

2) Then go for a walk in the woods or step out into your garden, pick up any materials, which seem to be resonating with you and with your impressions of the picture.

3) Make an arrangement. The simpler the better. Remember “less is more”.

4) Take a picture of your arrangement and e-mail it to me before September 15, 2015 ekaterina @ ikebanaweb dot com.

If there are enough participants (I would say should be at least 5) we will make a poll to select the winner and I will organize a nice prize. Are you in? If you are still hesitant, read on and I will give you a few hints on how to go about it. You will be surprised how much more you could feel and express if you just give yourself a chance.

Waterfall IkebanaWeb

For a few minutes just put on hold all the 10 000 things, which you should have done “yesterday” and quiet down those voices in your head, which say you don’t have time for this. You do have 5 minutes for exploring yourself. Just stay for a moment with the waterfall… in the forest… alone…

If you were standing there, would you feel the water with your bare feet? Would it be cold? Would you hear the waterfall, birds? Would you smell moss or freshness? Notice the emotions arising in your body, acknowledge them. Remember this feeling.

If you think of it, it is a miracle that you have just vividly experienced a place, which you have never visited. A photographer has captured a small part of a (remarkable) 3D reality into a two-dimensional frame. And now miles away and perhaps years later you feel real sensations of this waterfall. And what I want you to do is to continue the magic wheel of art and to try expressing those feeling back in the 3D world. You can use any materials or techniques you want.

When the next time (perhaps later this weekend) you wonder around nature try to remember this feeling of the waterfall. Look at grasses, trees, branches of shrubs, see if any are resonating with the feelings you have experienced “at the waterfall”. May be it will be the color, or texture of foliage, or a curve of a dry branch resembling the waterfall lines. There is no right or wrong, just go with what catches your eye, do not overthink it.

Bring your finds home. Look for a container. A big glass bottle or several cups together could make a great start. Even a plastic bottle could be made into an interesting container if you cut the top off or cut a large opening on the side. Do not restrict yourself to what is considered a proper flower container. Although there is nothing wrong with a normal vase either. Just listen to the sound of water while you are pouring it into the container and contemplate for a moment.

When you are done arranging your materials in the container, make sure you take time to enjoy it. Then take a few photos and attach them to the e-mail addressed to me. I am already getting excited thinking of the variety of pictures you folks will send. Can’t wait.

Enjoy your time with nature!

P.S. I need to make a disclaimer here: if you live in a city and visiting nature is not in your plan you can also try your nearest florist shop. Just make sure you give yourself time to feel which plant materials resonate with your “waterfall” emotions before buying them. Here is the picture of the waterfall once again, a bigger version.

Waterfall IkebanaWeb

 

______________

Don’t want to miss the next post? Get free updates from IkebanaWeb via e-mail.